Mark Twain’s “War Prayer”

Featuring Mark Twain’s War Prayer, complimented by ideas from Fernando Solanas + Octavio Getino, Susan Sontag and Howard Zinn

Friday, 01 April
Gladstone Hotel Art Bar
3 PM
Free

Facilitated by John Gianvito and cheyanne turions

As part of the 2011 Images Festival, filmmaker John Gianvito has been invited to select a reading in conjunction with the presentation of his film Vapor Trail (Clark).

Gianvito’s film is an investigation into the ecological disaster caused by a US military base on the Philippines–and its victims, their world. Vapor Trail (Clark) is a humble act of solidarity, a defiant work of remembrance, a rallying cry to rise and resist and a cinematic prose poem. Mark Twain’s War Prayer is a direct response to the Philippine-American War of 1899-1902, and in hindsight, it is impossible to read this short story as anything other than a warning not heeded. Gianvito’s film provides a suiting counterpoint to Twain’s text in that it bears testament to this unfortunate yet all too familiar dismissal of humane counsel.

Participation in No Reading After the Internet is free and open to everyone, regardless of their familiarity with a text or its author. Texts will be handed out at the salon. No pre-reading or research is required. But, if you’d like to take a look at the Twain text beforehand, you can so do here.

Participants are encouraged to attend the screening of Vapor Trail (Clark) on Sunday, 03 April, 6 PM at Jackman Hall (317 Dundas Street West).

John Gianvito is a film maker, teacher and curator living in Boston, Massachusetts. His films include The Flower of Pain (1983), Address Unknown (1985), The Mad Songs of Fernanda Hussein (2001) and Profit Motive and the Whispering Wind (2007). He is the editor of the book Andrei Tarkovsky: Interviews (2006). His latest film Vapor Trail (Clark) had it’s world premiere at the International Film Festival Rotterdam in 2010.

The event is co-presented with the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto.

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Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s “A World Split Apart”

March’s Reading: Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s “A World Split Apart”
Saturday, 19 March 2011
Victoria, BC at the Cornerstone (1301 Gladstone Avenue)
8pm
Free

Facilitated by Heather Cosidetto, Stefan Morales and cheyanne turions

Delivered in June, 1978 as the 327th Commencement Address at Harvard University, “A World Split Apart” scandalized yet captivated an audience of intellectuals that extended far beyond the graduates in the room.

Participation in No Reading After the Internet is free and open to everyone, regardless of their familiarity with a text or its author. Texts will be handed out at the salon. No pre-reading or research is required. But, if you’d like to take a look beforehand, you can so do here.

Alexander Solzhenitsyn was a Russian and Soviet novelist,dramatist, and historian. Through his often-suppressed writings, he helped to raise global awareness of the Gulag, the Soviet Union’s forced labor camp system – particularly in The Gulag Archipelago and One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, two of his best-known works. Solzhenitsyn was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1970.

Co-presented with The Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto and The Wayward School.

Nicholas Bourriaud’s “Radicals and Radicants” (Vancouver)

March’s Reading: “Radicals and Radicants” from The Radicant by Nicholas Bourriaud
Thursday, 17 March 2011
VIVO Media Arts (1965 Main Street), Vancouver BC
7pm
Free
Facilitated by Alex Muir and cheyanne turions

In conjunction with DIM Cinema’s presentation of The Permanent Longing for Elsewhere, a screening curated by cheyanne turions, March’s reading will explore Nicholas Bourriaud’s idea of what it means to be radicant. Following modernism’s attempts to distill essential essences, to postmodernism’s acceptance of cultural clutter, to the negotiating impulse of today’s altermodernity, Bourriaud crafts a botanical metaphor for the specific reality of how the immigrant, the exile, the tourist, and the urban wanderer have become the dominant figures of contemporary culture.

Participation in No Reading After the Internet is free and open to everyone, regardless of their familiarity with a text or its author. Texts will be handed out at the salon. No pre-reading or research is required.

Participants are encouraged to attend the related screening:

The Permanent Longing for Elsewhere
as part of DIM Cinema
Pacific Cinémathèque (1131 Howe)
Monday, 21 March 2011
7:30pm