Spike Milligan’s “The Goon Show”


June’s reading: an episode of Spike Milligan’s The Goon Show

Monday, 27 June 2011
XPACE (58 Ossington)
7pm
Free
Facilitated by Amy Lam, Jon McCurley and cheyanne turions

In conjunction with XPACE’s presentation of What Goes Around Comes Around, Phase One, artist duo Life of a Craphead have selected an episode of The Goon Show to read aloud in compliment to the exhibition. Curated by Derek Liddington and Jennie Suddick, What Goes Around Comes Around offers a glimpse into artistic trends that utilize collectivity as not only the means of production, but a platform for political and social interaction. Presented in three phases where artists will react, reshape and recontextualize each others contributions, Life of a Craphead will create the initial ambiance in the form a filmset. The Goon Show, a British radio program of the 1950s, segues with Life of a Craphead in their shared commitment to ludicrous plotlines, satirical takes on contemporary life and surreal uses of humour. The filmset may or may not be used as an impromptu stage for acting out the strange musings of The Goon Show.

Participation in No Reading After the Internet is free and open to everyone, regardless of their familiarity with a text or its author. Texts will be handed out at the salon. No pre-reading or research is required.

Participants are encouraged to attend the related exhibition, What Goes Around Comes Around, on view at XPACE Cultural Centre (58 Ossington), 18 June-19 August 2011.

Life of a Craphead is Toronto-based artists Jon McCurley and Amy Lam, who collaboration dates back to 2005. They do live comedy and plays and organize entertainment events. They specialize in creating unreasonable situations and promote feelings of “no control/no one knows/no one knows whats going on/what the hell/oh shit.” Amy Lam is President of the Board of Directors of Art Metropole, an internationally renowned centre for the distribution and promotion of artist-initiated publishing. Jon McCurely co-founded and co-curates Double Double Land, a music/art/theatre/everything venue in Toronto.

The event is co-presented with the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto and XPACE Cultural Centre.

Peter Schjeldahl’s “Of Ourselves and of Our Origins: Subjects of Art”

June’s reading: Peter Schjeldahl’s “Of Ourselves and of Our Origins: Subjects of Art”

Wednesday, 29 June 2011
LIFT (1137 Dupont)
7pm
Free
Facilitated by cheyanne turions

In conjunction with Gallery TPW’s presentation of The Normal Condition of Any Communication, Peter Schjeldahl’s “Of Ourselves and of Our Origins: Subjects of Art” has been selected to compliment the exhibition. Curated by cheyanne turions, The Normal Condition of Any Communication features works that explore the potential of participating in conversations that extend beyond a person’s particular subject position. Within Schjeldahl’s critique about whether or not it is possible to speak sensibly about what we like about art, he raises an important point about the negative import of identities that demarcate difference. In response, he proposes a non-political pronoun of “we” without “they,” thereby hinting at the nebulous thing that happens in an experience of great art. This utopic proposal of Schjeldahl’s is a place to begin imagining communication across distance from.

Participation in No Reading After the Internet is free and open to everyone, regardless of their familiarity with a text or its author. Texts will be handed out at the salon. No pre-reading or research is required.

Participants are encouraged to attend the related exhibition, The Normal Condition of Any Communication, on view at Gallery TPW (56 Ossington), 23 June-30 July 2011.

Peter Schjeldahl has been the art critic of The New Yorker since 1998. Prior to that he was a regular art critic for The New York Times, The Village Voice, ARTnews and 7 Days, and published five books of poetry between 1967 and 1981. His collections of criticism include The Hydrogen Jukebox (University of California Press, 1991) and Let’s See: Writings on Art from The New Yorker (Thames & Hudson, 2008). He won the Frank Jewett Mather Award for Excellence in Art Criticism in 1980 and the Clark Prize for Excellence in Arts Writing in 2008.

The event is co-presented with the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto and Gallery TPW.
Image credit: Reza Haeri’s All Restrictions End.

Giorgio Agamben’s “Notes on Gesture”

June’s Reading: “Notes on Gesture” by Giorgio Agamben
Thursday June 16 2011
VIVO Media Arts (1965 Main Street), Vancouver BC
7pm Salon Free
Facilitated by Alex Muir

For June, we will be looking at “Notes on Gesture” by Giorgio Agamben. This particular text is available in english via two different publications, Infancy and History (1993) and Means Without End (2000). It was originally written in 1992. It begins, “[by] the end of the nineteenth century, the Western bourgeoisie had definitely lost its gestures.” This idea of was taken up by our former programmer Kika Thorne, and used as a curatorial frame or theme for many of the works we showed at VIVO during her time at the centre. The text takes in the physiological studies of human motion done by Gilles de la Tourette, in parallel with early cinematographic experiments being conducted by Marey and Muybridge. It speaks of the cinematic project within the context of recuperation and loss. It attempts to make distinctions between gesture and image, as well as ethics and aesthetics, with respect to their relationship to the cinema. The text is useful to us as a means to potentially discuss previous works exhibited at VIVO, as well as a means to approach the idea of “old forms”–the return to the antiquated that forms the thematic for the upcoming edition of the Signal + Noise Media Arts Festival.

Please note that the date of this event is different than that which is posted in our seasonal pamphlet.

Giorgio Agamben is an Italian philosopher/cultural theorist. He has written extensively on sovereignty, biopolitics, the state of emergency, monasticism, language and history. He draws from a diverse set of figures and histories including Aristotle, the Roman Empire, Robert Walser, St. Francis, Walter Benjamin, Aby Warburg, and medieval Gypsies.

No Reading After the Internet is a monthly opportunity to gather and read a text aloud in hopes that it might provoke theoretical illumination on particular art works, or the broader scape within which such work exists. This program departs from Cineworks’ Thought on Film series, conceived by Cheyanne Turions. Whilst still very interested in cinema, the focus of this incarnation is softened to accommodate the more broad (and ever expanding) scope of media art.

The idea of a reading group isn’t new. No Reading nonetheless poses itself as an experimental learning and discussion space. Simply put, we are suspicious of our own reading abilities, and the extent to which our readings are conversant with one another. No Reading means to offer a slow space within which to retrace oursteps in the hopes of discovering individual and collective ways through the realms of language and interpretation. The strategieswe have at our disposal are twofold: through the yoking of our discussion to a text; and inducing conversation, where possible, between text and specific, local, contemporaneous art discussions and happenings.

Participation in No Reading After the Internet is free and open to everyone, regardless of his or her familiarity with a text or its author. Texts will be handed out at the gathering. No pre-reading or research is required. Those who wish to access the text in advance can contact traffic@videoout.ca