Giorgio Agamben’s “Notes on Gesture” in collaboration with Robin Cameron’s Projects’ Class Workshop

Featuring Giorgio Agamben’s “Notes on Gesture” in collaboration with Robin Cameron’s Projects’ Class Workshop

Sunday, 24 July 2011
Glyde Hall (studio 14) at the Banff Centre, Banff AB
8 PM
Free

As a collaboration of projects within the framework of Dexter Sinister’s From the Toolbox of a Serving Library summer residency at the Banff Centre, this iteration of No Reading After the Internet will feature Giorgio Agamben’s “Notes on Gensture.” Couched within the third project in Robin Cameron‘s workshop series, we will take our cue from Fionn Meade, who is a curator at the Sculpture Center in New York. He also teaches Critical Issues (Art History) at Columbia, which is where the culmination of this idea came from.

From Fionn Meade

Read Giorgio Agamben’s “Notes on Gesture.”
Watch Shahryar Nashat’s video Modern Body Comedy, and then we will do an exercise in Interpretation.

Agamben’s “Notes on Gesture” begins like this: “By the end of the nineteenth century the gestures of the Western bourgeoisie were irretrievably lost.” The text takes in the physiological studies of human motion done by Gilles de la Tourette, in parallel with early cinematographic experiments being conducted by Marey and Muybridge. It speaks of the cinematic project within the context of recuperation and loss. It attempts to make distinctions between gesture and image, as well as ethics and aesthetics, with respect to their relationship to the cinema.

Nashat’s Modern Body Comedy combines miscellaneous forms of theatre genres such as drama and comedy, but also reveals the act of creating artistic situations. Nashat, always interested in the dynamics of human bodies, builds up an outrageous tension, which is unpredictably dissolved by a physical incident reminding one of a very popular slapstick element.

Participation in No Reading After the Internet is free and open to everyone, regardless of their familiarity with a text or its author. Texts will be handed out at the salon. No pre-reading or research is required. Please bring a chair to sit on and drinks to drink.

Markus Miessen’s “Collaboration and the Conflictual”

 

Featuring Markus Miessen’s “Collaboration and the Conflictual”

Friday, 15 July 2011
meeting in the lobby of Lloyd Hall at the Banff Centre (picnic to follow), Banff AB
7 PM
Free

As a project within the framework of Dexter Sinister’s From the Toolbox of a Serving Library summer residency at the Banff Centre, this iteration of No Reading After the Internet will feature Markus Miessen’s “Collaboration and the Conflictual” as published in OK Do‘s OK Talk Helsinki/London:

“In this essay Berlin-based architect and writer Markus Miessen breaks the consensus machine within the cultural field. By suggesting conflictual participation and non-physical violence as productive modes of practice, and using spatial conditions as means of reflection, he demonstrates a framework for change.”

Participation in No Reading After the Internet is free and open to everyone, regardless of their familiarity with a text or its author. Texts will be handed out at the salon. No pre-reading or research is required. This particular meeting will take the form a picnic. Please bring food and drink as you see fit, but no alcohol please.

Markus Miessen is an architect, consultant, and writer based in Berlin. He runs the collaborative agency for spatial practice Studio Miessen, is co-founder of the architectural practice nOffice, and director of the Winter School Middle East (Kuwait). Miessen has taught at institutions such as the Architectural Association (London), Columbia, and MIT. He is currently a Professor for Architecture and Curatorial Practice at the Hochschule für Gestaltung in Karlsruhe, Germany, a Harvard Fellow, and completing his PhD at the Centre for Research Architecture (Goldsmiths, London).

Friedrich Nietzsche’s “The Birth of Tragedy”

July’s reading: An excerpt from Friedrich Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy

Wednesday, 13 July 2011
LIFT (1137 Dupont)
7 PM
Free

Tomonari Nishikawa in attendance

In conjunction with the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto’s summer residency, visiting artist Tomonari Nishikawa has been invited to select a reading in relation to filmmaking practice. Nishikawa’s 2003 film Apollo will be screened as part of the evening’s discussion.

One of Friedrich Nietzsche’s earlier works, The Birth of Tragedy mines classical Greek theatre and the music of Richard Wagner for a life affirming theory of being. Nietzsche was working in response to a pervasive social nihilism that had risen up in the gap between traditional religious ways of thinking and modern science as ways of explaining the world. In art, Nietzsche believed, there was a possible “key to renewed human flourishing for a humanity bereft both of the consolations of religious faith and of confidence in reason and science as substitutes for it” (Richard Schacht).

Apollo is a hand-crafted film made by various techniques to obtain photographic images on celluloid, and it showcases Nishikawa’s interests in medium, materiality and cinematic apparati, especially the film projector and human visual perception. Nishikawa cites Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy as an influence on this early film work, wherein he attempted to conjure Dionysian characteristics in moving images without a narrative. However, viewing the film as a failure, Nishikawa named the film Apollo. A particular emphasis on the evening’s discussion will be placed on the potential for non-narrative moving images to embody Dionysian qualities.

Participation in No Reading After the Internet is free and open to everyone, regardless of their familiarity with a text or its author. Texts will be handed out at the salon. No pre-reading or research is required. However, if you’d like to preview The Birth of Tragedy beforehand, you can do so here.

Tomonari Nishikawa is a filmmaker and installation artist whose works have been presented internationally, notably at Berlinale, Edinburgh International Film Festival, Hong Kong International Film Festival, EXiS: Experimental Film and Video Festival, MoMA P.S.1, Disjecta Art Space and San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery. Nishikawa works as a guest adviser/curator of Yebisu International Festival for Art & Alternative Visions in Tokyo, and he is one of the co-founders of KLEX: Kuala Lumpur Experimental Film and Video Festival in Malaysia, for which he works now as a festival adviser. He currently teaches at Cinema Department, Binghamton University.

The event is presented by the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto.