Reading Exercises

Image taken from

Image taken from “Honouring the Truth,Reconciling for the Future: Summary of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.”

Reading Exercises
Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery (1455 boul. de Maisonneuve Ouest, Montréal)
19 November 2015–23 January 2016
Tuesday–Friday: 12:00-18:00
Saturday: 12:00-17:00

Curated by Katrie Chagnon
Featuring Fiona Banner, Simon Bertrand, Clayton Cubitt, Ricardo Cuevas, Brendan Fernandes, Gary Hill, Bouchra Khalili, Ève K. Tremblay, Nicoline van Harskamp and #ReadTheTRCReport, an initiative by Erica Violet Lee, Joseph Murdoch-Flowers, and Zoe Todd, presented in collaboration with No Reading After the Internet, a project by Amy Kazymerchyk, Alexander Muir, and cheyanne turions

This winter, in collaboration with #ReadTheTRCReport, No Reading After the Internet will be participating in Reading Exercises, an exhibition organized by Katrie Chagnon at Montréal’s Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery. Whereas No Reading would usually work with an artist to read aloud and discuss texts that had informed their practice, here, instead, we took the opportunity of the exhibition to put No Reading in dialogue with another project that is also concerned with the embodied politic of reading aloud.

#ReadTheTRCReport is a citizen’s initiative generated by Zoe Todd, Erica Violet Lee and Joseph Murdoch-Flowers. This project was developed as a means of making the entire Executive Summary of the Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada available online in video format. The report acts as a testament to the “cultural genocide”1 perpetrated by the Canadian state and Canadians upon Indigenous communities, notably by means of the residential school system. The document is meant to shed light on our complex collective history and “to lay the foundation for the important question of reconciliation.”2

In reaction to the publication of the report in June 2015, Métis activist, writer and teacher Chelsea Vowel, launched a call on her blog, âpihtawikosisân, for people to read the document in order to educate themselves on the permanent damages caused by Canada’s colonial history and to critically engage with the TRC’s findings. The video reading project initiated by Todd, Lee and Murdoch-Flowers, serves as a direct response to Vowel’s call, as well as a means to increase the report’s accessibility, to grant it life and to honour residential school survivors. Using social media (Twitter, Facebook, e-mail, et cetera), the trio has invited individuals from throughout Canada and elsewhere (Indigenous and non-Indigenous), to record themselves reading through one of 140 sections of the report, and to share their videos on YouTube. Accessible by searching #ReadTheTRCReport, the videos are integrated within a playlist containing the complete English version of the document.

A productive political exercise, this project is rooted within the current Canadian understanding of the existing relations with Indigenous communities. It testifies to the possibility—or rather the necessity—for each of us to exercise agency through the act of reading.  

The dialogue between these two projects will be presented through a series of public readings and discussions that examine the process, structure and form of the report, histories of oral and textual testimony, and the role of literacy in political engagement, scheduled to take place in January 2016.

Within this context, No Reading and #ReadTheTRCReport will think out-loud and collectively about the politics of reading aloud, of political action more generally, and will consider what our projects can learn from each other. Visitors will be invited to contribute to the production of the yet to be undertaken French video edition of the #ReadTheTRCReport.

The exhibition opens on 18 November 2015, and we hope to see you in January, when folks from both projects gather together in Montréal to think + talk + celebrate + share.

1. Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, Honouring the Truth, Reconciling for the Future. Summary of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, 2015, 1. Online : (accessed October 29, 2015)

2. Ibid., VI.

witness / témoin nichola feldman-kiss

nicola feldman-kiss,

nichola feldman-kiss, “after Africa \ a yard of ashes,” 2011-2012.

Friday, 23 October 2015
Ottawa Art Gallery (Arts Court, 2 Daly Avenue, Ottawa)
7 PM

Reflecting on the recurrent themes emerging in her survey exhibition witness, which is currently on display at the Ottawa Art Gallery, this salon will feature texts selected by nichola feldman-kiss that have contextually informed the works in the exhibition.

Excerpts will be drawn from Maggie Nelson’s The Art of Cruelty, whose reflections on brutal honesty position cruelty as a careful force, and William Steig’s Rotten Island, which the artist credits (among a few others) for teaching her to read out loud.

witness is a comprehensive survey that celebrates the last 15 years of the Toronto-based artist’s creative practice. A powerful examination of the living postcolonial body, this provocative collection of installations entangles the personal and the political to understand how the body becomes in relation to discourses of Otherness. Through a self-conscious autobiographical lens, feldman-kiss explores her own body and psyche as political sites of resistance through which to complicate the aesthetics and interpretations of self-portraiture. The works in witness tell the stories of cultural, experiential and historical conflict. Asking us to turn our gaze outwards, the most recent works in this exhibition offers witness to Sudanese conflict specifically, and more generally provides evidence of global exploitation and oppression. Throughout witness, the works pose the body as an offering to bridge the chasm between us and them, reflecting on the means of traversing between here and there.

nichola feldman-kiss is a Canadian, German, Jamaican artist exploring relational interpretations of body and embodiment, identity and autobiography, witness and traumatic memory. Visit her website here.

Special thanks to the Ottawa Art Gallery for hosting this salon.

Interim Measures

Interim Measures image

“Untitled,” Brady Cranfield and Jamie Hilder (2012).

Saturday, 19 September 2015
8-11 (233 Spadina Avenue)
3 PM

Artists and curator in attendance.

As part of Interim Measures, an exhibition curated by Denise Ryner and featuring the work of Chris Lee, Brady Cranfield and Jamie Hilder, this salon will feature texts selected by the artists and curator that explore the visible and invisible relationships that link financial deregulation and commodity money systems to conventions of value, production and presentation in art. Excerpts will be drawn from Andrea Fraser “L’1%, C’est moi,” Terry Atkinson’s “Vogl’s Combo,” and Emlio Moreno’s “Other Issues: Currency Delimiting Sovereignty.”

The exhibition’s title, Interim Measures, refers to corrective actions or policies enacted in governance and finance in response to a crisis with the expectation of an eventual return to a desired norm. However it is often the case that temporary situations evolve to become the status quo.

The most recent global financial crisis in 2008 has encouraged artists and curators to critically address the functions of capital and finance through their work. However these examinations often establish a disjuncture between the work of the artist and the economic structures they aim to represent. Through soundwork, printed matter and performance, artists Chris Lee, Brady Cranfield and Jamie Hilder activate their investigations of economist-derived aesthetics and speculative value. The artists in Interim Measures challenge assumptions of the extraterritoriality of the spaces of art and cultural production to the fluctuations of speculative finance and cognitive capitalism.

Chris Lee (Toronto) is a graphic designer and educator based in Toronto and Buffalo. He is a graduate of the Graphic Design Master’s program at the Sandberg Institute (Amsterdam). While at the Sandberg, his work focused on speculative visualizations of (alternative) currencies, and their attendant institutions and ephemera. He has also facilitated several workshops in Scotland, the Netherlands, and Croatia, and has written essays on the relationship between graphic design and currency. Chris is also currently a member of the programming committee at Gendai Gallery (Toronto), serves on the editorial board of Scapegoat Journal (Toronto) and is an Associate Professor of Graphic Design at the University at Buffalo SUNY. He recently co-edited with Maiko Tanaka the Gendai Gallery publication Model Minority (2014) with contributions by Angad Bhalla, Tings Chak, Alvis Choi, Christine Choy, Richard J.F. Day, Jacqueline Hoang Nguyen, Jinhan Ko / Instant Coffee, Will Kwan, Mona Oikawa, Liz Park, Gordon Pon, Kerri Sakamoto, Min Sook Lee, Vincent Tao, Dan S. Wang and Ryan Wong.

Jamie Hilder (Vancouver) is an artist, writer and critic. He has had solo exhibitions at Artspeak, Charles H. Scott Gallery and most recently at 221A in collaboration with Brady Cranfield. Hilder completed his doctoral dissertation on the International Concrete Poetry Movement at the University of British Columbia in 2010. From 2011-2013 he was a post-doctoral researcher in the Graduate School of Education and Information Sciences at UCLA and is currently an instructor at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design. He has also exhibited and published work in the United States and Europe.

Brady Cranfield (Vancouver) is a sound and visual artist, musician and writer. He received his MA in Communications and MFA from Simon Fraser University. He has also collaborated with artist and curator Kathy Slade on multiple audio projects such as 12 Sun Songs (2009) and 10 Riot Songs (2011). His recent exhibition Due To Injuries… at 221A with Jamie Hilder was also published as an artist book of the same name which includes contributions by Franco Berardi, Jaleh Mansoor, Enda Brophy, Cecily Nicholson and Steve Collis. Cranfield also teaches intermittently at Emily Carr University of Art and Design and is the co-proprietor of Selectors Records shop and performance venue in Vancouver.

Denise Ryner (Vancouver) is a curator, writer and arts worker. She received her MA in Art History at the University of British Columbia. Her recent exhibitions include Public Objects, Private Frames which is currently showing at the Canadian Heritage regional office in Toronto and Location/Dislocation (2011) at the Jackman Humanities Institute. She has worked in numerous galleries in Toronto including Art Metropole and the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery. Currently she works at the Vancouver Art Gallery, is an instructor at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design, and works at the Audain Gallery where she recently programmed a series of walks called Rain or Shine Saturdays.

Special thanks to the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto for their ongoing support of this project and to 8-11 for hosting this salon.

Documentation courtesy of Tucker McLachlan.

Documentation courtesy of Tucker McLachlan.

Bik Van der Pol’s “Eminent Domain” at The Power Plant

Bik Van der Pol, Eminent Domain, 2015. Installation view: The Power Plant, Toronto, 2015. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

Bik Van der Pol, Eminent Domain, 2015. Installation view: The Power Plant, Toronto, 2015. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

Saturday, 22 August 2015
The Power Plant (231 Queens Quay West, Toronto)
4 PM

Facilitated by cheyanne turions

Reflecting the collaborative strategies at play in their current exhibition on view at The Power Plant entitled Eminent Domain, artists Bik Van der Pol have compiled selections from articles and essays that have been instrumental in developing the project. Readings will include excerpts from Bruno Latour’s Agency at the Time of the Anthropocene and Bernd Scherer’s The Monsters.

For their commissioned project at The Power Plant, Bik Van der Pol investigate the ways that human activity in the globalized age have had a direct effect on ecological systems. The exhibition title references the concept of “eminent domain,” a term coined by author Hugo Grotius in 1625. “Eminent domain” is understood as the power that the State may exercise over land within its territory, whereby the government or one of its agencies has the right to expropriate private property for public use through payment or compensation. By foregrounding this concept, Bik Van der Pol’s project alludes to the increasing privatization of previously public goods including territory, property and the public domain at large.

Through their practice, Bik Van der Pol aim to articulate and understand how art can produce a public sphere, and to create space for speculation and imagination. This includes forms of mediation through which publicness is not only defined but also created. Their working method is based on co-operation and research inquiries surrounding the activation of situations serving the creation of platforms for various kinds of communicative activities. Recent solo shows and projects include Ternitz, Austria (2014); 31st Bienal de São Paulo (2014); Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam (2014); CAFAM Biennial, Beijing (2014); the Biennale of Mercosul, Porto Alegre (2013); Hoog Catherijne, Utrecht (2013); Between A Rock and A Hard Place in collaboration with Musagetes, Sudbury, ON (2011); The ENEL Award; MACRO, Rome (2010); and The Western Front, Vancouver (2010). Recent curatorial projects include Kunstfort Asperen, Acqouy (2011); and Plug In, Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven (2009). They are currently the course directors of the School of Missing Studies at the Sandberg Institute in Amsterdam.

Special thanks to The Power Plant for hosting this salon, and thanks also to the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto for their ongoing support of No Reading After the Internet (Toronto).

Eating Bodies: Towards a Consummate Consumption

food garbageNo Reading After the Internet is excited to be co-presenting the summer session of SCHOOL, an ongoing series of informal school-type seminars for people of any and all educational backgrounds organized by Jonathan Adjemian and Xenia Benivolski.

Eating Bodies: Towards a Consummate Consumption will be facilitated by Leila Timmins and cheyanne turions.

Readings will be sent out in advance of each session by email. We invite all styles of engagement with the texts—mastery is not expected, desired nor possible. Those interested are strongly encouraged to attend all four sessions if possible, but drop-ins are welcome too.

PWYC donations taken after each session, all of which go to thank the facilitators for their time.

If you are planning to attend, please email to ensure that you get readings and notifications. All are welcome.

What else is food, beyond nourishment? This summer session of SCHOOL will focus on the social and aesthetic aspects of food, where eating is considered as act with repercussions beyond the fulfillment of a basic need. Drawing on texts that operate outside of the sentimentality and machismo pervasive in much food writing, taste will be explored as something conditioned by class, gender, culture and history. Born of a desire to indulge and critically interrogate our tastes, especially as they resonate outward from our own plates, we hope to use food as symbol for human relations, exploring patterns of interaction between and within societies.

Over the course of four weeks, we will read a variety of texts—theoretical and comedic, historical and contemporary, fiction and not. Approaching SCHOOL as an experiment in informal education, please note that we are not experts in these texts, though our curiosity is voracious. Understandings of the texts will be performed collectively, and in addition to generally discussing each week’s theme, participants will be asked to share selections from the texts they find incendiary or spot-on. These observations will be used to guide our conversations.

Colonial Foodstuffs

12 July 2015, 4 PM

MOCCA (952 Queen Street West)

with guest Jonah Campbell

Reading Jonah Campbell’s “Notes Preliminary to Actually Thinking About an Anti-Colonial Food Writing” from Still Crapulent and Kyla Wazana Tompkins’s “‘She Made the Table a Snare to Them’: Sylvester Graham’s Imperial Dietics” from Racial Indigestion: Eating Bodies in the 19th Century

Session one,

Session one, “Colonial Foodstuffs,” hosted within Dean Baldwin’s “Queen West Yacht Club.” Photo documentation by Xenia Benivolski.




19 July 2015, 4 PM

8-11 (233 Spadina Avenue)

Reading Kingsley Amis’s “The Hangover” from Everyday Drinking; M.F.K. Fisher’s “G is for Gluttony” from An Alphabet for Gourmets and “How to be Cheerful Through Starving” from How to Cook a Wolf; and Walter Benjamin’s “Fresh Figs” from his Selected Writings: Part 1 1927-1930.

Session two,

Session two, “Gluttony,” hosted in 8-11’s backyard. Photo documentation by Gabby Moser.

Session two,

Session two, “Gluttony,” hosted in 8-11’s backyard. Photo documentation by Leila Timmins.

Cannibalistic Feminisms

26 July 2015, 4 PM

MOCCA (952 Queen Street West)

Reading Jonah Campbell’s “On Nigella Lawson, Impossible Witnessing, and the Reification of Analysis” from Still Crapulent; excerpts from F.T. Marinetti/Fillia’s The Futurist Cookbook; and excerpts from Three Banquets for a Queen, edited by Charlotte Birnbaum; as well as watching Candice Lin’s Tales from the Kitchen: Beggar’s Revenge Chicken.

Impromptu post-salon BBQ of frog legs and celery, courtesy of Dean Baldwin. Image courtesy of Leila Timmins.

Impromptu post-salon BBQ of frog legs and celery, courtesy of Dean Baldwin. Photo documentation by Leila Timmins.

Art-food and Taste-making

02 August 2015, 4 PM

8-11 (233 Spadina Avenue)

with guest Danielle St-Amour

Reading Martha Rosler’s The Art of Cooking: A Dialogue Between Julia Child and Craig ClaiborneHelen Rosner’s “Christina Tosi Climbs to the Top of Cool Girl Mountain With ‘Milk Bar Life’” from Eater, Carolyn Korsmeyer’s “The Meaning of Taste and the Taste of Meaning” from Making Sense of Taste and Carol Goodden’s “FOOD and the City” from Collapse VII.

Drinking onion wine in 8-11's backyard. Photo documentation by Xenia Benivolski .

Drinking onion wine in 8-11’s backyard. Photo documentation by Xenia Benivolski .


LEILA TIMMINS is a writer and curator based in Toronto. She is the Head of Exhibitions at Gallery 44 and currently sits on the Board of C Magazine and the Education Programming Committee at the Art Gallery of Ontario.

CHEYANNE TURIONS is an independent, Toronto-based curator and writer. She sits on the Board of Directors for Kunstverein Toronto, the Editorial Advisory Committee for C Magazine and the Advisory Board for the newly federated institution comprising the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery and University of Toronto Art Centre. She is the director of No Reading After the Internet (Toronto).

Thanks to MOCCA and 8-11 for their support of this session of SCHOOL and thanks also to the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto for their ongoing support of No Reading After the Internet (Toronto).

Mia Feuer’s “Synthetic Seasons” at the Esker Foundation

Mia Feuer's "Boreal," 2013 (detail). Photo: Sue Wrbican.

Mia Feuer’s “Boreal,” 2013 (detail). Photo: Sue Wrbican.

Tuesday, 23 June 2015
Esker Foundation
444-1011 9 Ave SE, Calgary
6:30 PM
Free, but advance registration is suggested.

Facilitated by cheyanne turions.

Departing from the possible futures of oil production and consumption that are invoked in Mia Feuer’s solo exhibition at the Esker Foundation, Synthetic Seasons, the artist has compiled selections from articles and essays that have been instrumental in developing the project. The salon will feature excerpts from Lucy Lippard’s Undermining and Esther Leslie’s Synthetic Worlds.

Feuer is interested in the post-natural landscape, visible sites where human interaction—be it personal, social, political, or financial—has altered or is in the process of rapidly changing the land, and thus our relationship to it. Her work makes connections between our intense material dependency and the accelerated environmental impact this creates. Collapsed Soviet coalmines find common ground with bombed out buildings in the Suez Canal; trees feathered and tarred in the Athabasca Oil Sands sail alongside crystal blue glacial tongues of the Arctic Circle. Synthetic chandeliers of industrial waste mix and float among the black wings of ravens, a sky that pours down stinking pitch, an inky rink at the end of the world. Feuer stands at the centre of the storm, creating brilliant and ambitious work that calls attention to these damaged sites, but also surprisingly finds beauty and hope amidst the crushing mess.

Born in Winnipeg, Mia Feuer received a BFA from the University of Winnipeg in 2004 and an MFA in 2009 from the Department of Sculpture + Extended Media at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. The artist currently lives and works in Oakland where she is Assistant Professor in Sculpture at the California College of the Arts.

Special thanks to the Esker Foundation for hosting this salon.

Theorizing the Spoken Word

This rumination on the relation between text and voice is excerpted from Chus Pato’s Secession (2009), from the chapter entitled “This I Folds and Unfolds Until a Last Fold Which is a Dream,” as translated by Erín Moure.

Writing evokes, evokes the voice that in humans is that of an animal that learned language, various languages, all of them articulated. As for the voice (to read aloud, present a poem), nothing brings it closer to the text; a text is complete in its writing, and writing is an absence, a forgetting. This dismemory (the forgetting of winter, of the bird snare, of angels running when they meet the gaze) of the voice that speaks or reads the poem is what makes writing possible. These are letters, the rough draft; but precisely for this reason, because this base is where letters emerge, writing is the sole possibility of remembering the voice, the voice that in humans is the voice of an animal that learns interminable ABC that calls out constantly through the voice, through the lost moment in which someone articulates a voice in speech. Afterward, a silence exists to speak the world, then all speak, then time and history and grammar arrive.