The Origin of the Work of Art

10358920_1127330833966991_943577105047713320_o

Saturday, 30 April 2016
Justina M. Barnicke Gallery
2 PM
Free

As part of Rehearsal for Objects Lie on a Table, which is curated by Emelie Chhangur, this salon is hosted by Kevin Temple and Michael Maranda, who invite a collective reading of Martin Heidegger’s “The Origin of the Work of Art” in the context of object oriented ontology and Gertrude Stein’s Objects Lie on a Table. In “The Origin of the Work of Art,” Heidegger confronts the history of aesthetics for uncritically accepting the distinction between subjects and the objects of art. Heidegger, by contrast, locates aesthetic experience beneath the threshold of the subject/object distinction to uncover the ontology of the work of art.

Kevin Temple is a writer and critic. He is currently a PhD candidate in philosophy at The New School for Social Research, New York.

Michael Maranda is a Toronto-based artist and assistant curator at the AGYU.

Rehearsal for Objects Lie on a Table is on view until April 30 at the Art Museum at the University of Toronto.

Image credit: Diane Borsato, Tea Service (the conservators will wash the dishes), 2013. Museum action/intervention and archival photographs. Courtesy of the artist.

Special thanks to the Art Museum at the University of Toronto for hosting this salon and to the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto for their ongoing support of this project.

Reading Alice Driver and Susan Buck-Morss as selected by Joni Murphy

Still from "Céline et Julie vont en bateau" (1974), directed by Jacques Rivette.

Still from “Céline et Julie vont en bateau” (1974), directed by Jacques Rivette.

Saturday, 23 April 2016
Art Metropole
4 PM
Free

Reflecting on themes emerging from her debut novel Double Teenage, which has just been published by BookThug, this salon will feature texts selected by Joni Murphy that have been instrumental in the development of her work.

Joni Murphy in attendance.

Exploring  ongoing patterns of violence against women (especially Indigenous women and women of colour) in relation to NAFTA and neoliberalism, Murphy investigates the matrix of violence wrought by western philosophical, economic, and cultural traditions. Excerpts will be drawn from Alice Driver’s “Why Targeted Violence Against Women in Juárez Is Not A Myth” and Susan Buck-Morss’s “The Flaneur, The Sandwichman and the Whore.”

Double Teenage tells the story of Celine and Julie, two girls coming of age in the 1990s in a desert town close to the US–Mexico border. Starting from their shared love of theatre, the girls move into a wider world that shimmers with intellectual and artistic possibility, but at the same time, is dense with threat. This unrelenting novel shines a spotlight on paradoxes of Western culture. It asks impossible questions about the media’s obsession with sexual violence as it twins with a social unwillingness to look at real pain. It asks what it feels like to be a girl, simultaneously a being and a thing, feeling in a marketplace. Double Teenage is a portrait of the recent past, seen through the cloudy lens of now, offering a way to see through violence into an emotionally alive place beyond the myriad traps of girlhood.

Participants are invited to attend a reading by Joni Murphy on Thursday, 21 April 21 2016 at BookThug’s Spring 2016 book launch featuring readings by Jacob Wren, Malcolm Sutton, Joni Murphy, Margaret Christakos, Adrienne Gruber, Jennifer Zilm, François Turcot, Stephen Thomas and Alessandro Porco. Details can be found here.

Joni Murphy is a writer and artist working between critical theory and fiction, writing, performance and sound. The quotidian workings of state violence, literary misprision, and subtle forms of resistance to neoliberalism are consistent themes in her varied creative output. Visit her website here.

Special thanks to Art Metropole for hosting this salon and to the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto for their ongoing support of this project.

Walter Scott’s “Sequel to Guts”

FullSizeRender

Thursday, 21 April 2016
Doris McCarthy Gallery at the University of Toronto Scarborough
7 PM
Free

This special edition of No Reading After the Internet will feature a new performance work by Walter Scott presented at the exhibition opening of How a Living Day is Made.

Sequel to Guts is a collage of new and existing writing, reconfigured to create original associations between the fictions and reality of the artist, the audience and the gallery environment. Against the backdrop of a new, site-specific mural, Scott will animate the forms and narratives of the drawing: as the written words are performed over the changing backgrounds, they will create associations with the images encountered along the way.

Curated by cheyanne turions, How a Living Day is Made is an exhibition about survival strategies that features the work of Aisha Sasha John, Rachelle Sawatsky and Walter Scott. Their practices open up places of affect, empathy and entanglement, staking a claim for the vibrancy of being recovered from the banal, systemic or heroic struggles of making a life in the world today.

Walter Scott is an interdisciplinary artist working across writing, illustration, performance and sculpture. In 2011, while living in Montreal, he began a comic book series, Wendy, exploring the narrative of a fictional young woman living in an urban centre who aspires to global success and art stardom but whose dreams are perpetually derailed. The position of the outsider and shape shifter are central to this body of work and the influence of feminist icons such as Elle Woods in Legally Blonde and artist, punk poet, experimental novelist and filmmaker Kathy Acker lingers. Recent exhibitions include Fictive Communities, Koganecho Bazaar, Yokohama, Japan 2014; Pre-Existing Work, Macaulay & Co. Fine Art, Vancouver 2015; and Stopping the Sun in Its Course, Francois Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles 2015.

This special edition of No Reading After the Internet is presented as part of the exhibition How a Living Day is Made, which is produced as part of the requirements for the MVS degree in Curatorial Studies at the University of Toronto.

Special thanks to the Doris McCarthy Gallery for hosting this performance and to the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto for their ongoing support of this project.

DMG_logo