Braiding Theory

Tuesday, 19 January 2016
Leonard & Bina Ellen Gallery (1455 boul. de Maisonneuve Ouest, Montréal)
7 PM
Free

As part of the Reading Exercises exhibition curated by Katrie Chagnon, the three founding members of No Reading After the Internet—Amy Kazymerchyk, Alex Muir and cheyanne turions—will lead a special salon that departs from the #ReadTheTRCReport project entitled Braiding Theory. Braiding Theory is a pedagogical framework coined by Lakota artist Dana Claxton that exercises attention and care in reading, interpretation and synthesis.

Excerpts will be drawn from Erica Violet Lee’s “‘Indigenizing the Academy’ without Indigenous people: who can teach our stories?” published on her website Moontime Warrior, Val Napoleon’s “Thinking About Indigenous Legal Orders” published by the National Centre for First Nations Governance and Zoe Todd’s “Rethinking Aesthetics and Ontology through Indigenous Law: On the work of Val Napoleon and Loretta Todd” published by C Magazine.

Erica Violet Lee is a Cree undergraduate student of philosophy at the University of Saskatchewan. She is an Indigenous feminist, and writes at moontimewarrior.com. Since speaking at the first Idle No More teach-in in 2012, Erica has been recognized as an international youth leader with the movement.

Val Napoleon is the Law Foundation Professor of Aboriginal Justice and Governance at the Faculty of Law, University of Victoria. She is from north east British Columbia (Treaty 8) and a member of Saulteau First Nation. She is also an adopted member of the Gitanyow (Gitksan) House of Luuxhon, Ganada (Frog) Clan. Val worked as a community activist and consultant in northwestern BC for over 25 years, specializing in health, education, and justice issues. Her dissertation on Gitksan law and legal theory was awarded the UVIC Governor General’s Gold Medal for best dissertation in 2009.Val’s current research focuses on indigenous legal traditions, indigenous legal theory, indigenous feminism, citizenship, self-determination, and governance.

Zoe Todd (Métis) is from Amiskwaciwâskahikan (Edmonton) in the Treaty Six Area of Alberta, Canada. She writes about Indigeneity, art, architecture, decolonization and healing in urban contexts. She also studies human-animal relations, colonialism and environmental change in northern Canada. Her art practice incorporates writing, spoken word, beading, drawing and film to tell stories about being Métis in the Prairies. She is a lecturer in Anthropology at Carleton University, a PhD Candidate in Social Anthropology at the University of Aberdeen, and she was a 2011 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Scholar.

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Braiding Theory at the Leonard & Bina Ellen Gallery. Photo credit: Jean-Louis René.

 

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