Rasheed Araeen’s “A New Beginning: Beyond Postcolonial Cultural Theory and Identity Politics,” as selected by June Pak

Pak clip

Saturday, 09 August 2014
26 (26 Mackenzie Crescent)
3 PM
Free

As part of the exhibition June Pak @ 26, this salon will feature excerpts from Rasheed Araeen’s “A New Beginning: Beyond Postcolonial Cultural Theory and Identity Politics,” as selected by June Pak.

June Pak in attendance.

When discussing the topic of ethnicity in visual arts, visibility is often emphasized: being visibly different from others, presenting one’s difference visibly to others and representing what it means to be different visually. But what if that difference is invisible? 

Departing from these questions, which are central to Pak’s exhibition, excerpts from Rasheed Araeen’s 2000 essay “A New Beginning” will be read aloud. The founding editor of Third Text, Araeen stirs up the art establishment in this essay by questioning the institutionalization and categorization of ethnicity. His argument on art institutions’  theoretical influence on ethnic art/artists extends Pak’s fundamental query on the concept of visibility.

June Pak was born in Seoul, South Korea, and now lives in Toronto, Canada. Her work investigates the currently limited methods of understanding ethnicity in the visual arts due to the universalization and institutionalization of “ethnic work.” By utilizing assumed functions of hyphenation, as to both connect and divide two (or more) entities, she is exploring different means to articulate visualization of ethnicity that resists the prescribed ethnic subject’s positioning in the current multi-cultural and multi-ethnic society. She is a PhD candidate in Studio Art at York University.

This meeting of No Reading After the Internet (Toronto) is supported by the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto (as always). Special thanks to 26 for hosting this salon.

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